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What Is Apple's 2016 Going To Look Like?

How is 2016 going to look for the tech giant?

3Dec

Danny Boyle's biographical film based on the life and career of Steve Jobs hasn't been the box office hit many expected. While Steve Jobs will always be remembered for being the creative force behind Apple, under Tim Cook, the company's new CEO, things are going well. In 2015, profits are up by 38%, despite disappointing sales figures for both the iPhone 6S and the Apple Watch according to Wall Street analysts.

As the new year approaches, let's take a look at five things to expect from Apple in 2016.

iPhone 7

The iPhone is Apple's biggest profit generator. Despite Wall Street's assertion that 2015's iPhones haven't been as successful as expected, Apple still managed to sell 47.5 million units - a 35% year-on-year increase.

The new iPhone's appearance remains a matter for debate. Some say that it'll be so thin that there will be no headphone jack, while others claim that Apple has a new four-inch model up its sleeve. They could very well bring out both, or, of course, neither.

With Apple now releasing at least one new model each year, something, in whatever shape or form, should be expected.

Apple Watch 2

The Apple Watch was arguably the most eagerly anticipated tech-release of 2015. With 38 models already available, the company was clearly trying to cater to a broad market, and it seems that it's paid off.

It's the best selling smartwatch of all time, with sales six times bigger than its nearest competitor. Yet compared to the 40 million sales prediction made before the watch's release, some are still calling it a failure.

Although the pre-release estimates proved to be widely optimistic, it has been praised for its accurate heart rate monitor and design. The next Apple Watch will, however, need to come with a longer battery life and better usability.

TechRadar predict that the second Apple Watch will be released in September 2016 alongside the iPhone 7. In terms of new features, James Rogerson states that improvements will include: 'native app support, tetherless Wi-Fi and the ability to watch videos, reply to emails and make FaceTime audio calls direct from the Watch.'

If you are expecting a more traditional circular dial, you will probably be disappointed

Apple Music Update

It's still hard to judge Apple Music. Tim Cook claims that the service now has 6.5 million paying users, a long way short of Spotify's count, but more than Pandora, Tidal and Rhapsody. For a service barely four months old, that's not bad going. If an update does come, expect usability issues to be redesigned and new artists to become available.

It's also the only thing keeping iPods on the shelves.

iOS 10

The same logic applied to the iPhone can be used for Apple's operating system; they bring a new version out each year, so why should we expect 2016 to be any different?

Apple has traditionally announced the arrival of a new iOS every June, with an Autumn release date in mind. As mentioned on MacWorld, this gives their developers time to iron out any bugs that have emerged.

A new security system is likely, making it almost impossible to jailbreak, as well as new features linked to the Internet of Things.

Apple TV Streaming service

Rumors surrounding an Apple streaming service aren't anything new. And even with Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime currently dominating the space, there is still room for another major competitor.

There was speculation that the service would be released in conjunction with the new Apple TV iteration, but that never came to fruition. A Bloomberg report stated that slow dealings with CBS and 21st Century Fox were the main reason behind this. MacWorld also claim that Apple hadn't done enough to ensure a 'glitch-free viewing experience'. A subscription - according to MarketWatch - could also set you back around $40 dollars each month, considerably more than any competitors.

Analysts at J.P Morgan, however, remain confident that a streaming service will be released in 2016.

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