FOLLOW

FOLLOW

SHARE

Pokemon Go: Gotta Catch All The Data

Who hasn’t heard of Pokémon Go? It’s the augmented reality game that has taken the world by storm, earning £1.1m per day since it was launched last week.

9Aug

Who hasn’t heard of Pokémon Go? It’s the augmented reality game that has taken the world by storm, earning £1.1m per day since it was launched last week. Players venture out into the real world to capture mysterious beasts by physically visiting locations where they think Pokémon may be hiding.

Using augmented reality technology means that you have a real map of your location, complete with Pokémon Gyms, PokeStops and various area with Pokémon just waiting to be found. In short, your local pizzeria may be the new PokeGym in your area and your park? That could be rife with wild Pokémon!

However, get this: Pokémon Go isn’t one of these ‘pay to win’ games. The user-generated data is the real gem behind the game.
It is rare for a business to be able to capture data generated by a large amount of people as they physically move around and gathering information on how, when, where, why and who they are with has vast opportunities.

Location, location, location and how it affects data.

Pokémon Go has in-app purchases. Pokeballs, for example allow the user to capture even more Pokémons, so the avid player can travel to PokeStops as a way to help them ‘catch ‘em all’. A few details and a couple of pounds later; extra Pokeballs! Rewind to the part about ‘a few details’. This information, which will be constantly updated when the player buys more Pokeballs is current, precise and accurate. It provides data about the age of the player, their email or phone number, their name and location. What more in the way of data could marketers want?

It Pays To Be A Hotspot

The data gathered regarding the players’ location benefits local businesses who can pay for in-game bonuses which mean that lots of Pokémon can be found in their location. So the data selling isn’t a revenue stream in this instance, but Nintendo could certainly analyse their data, knowing it is current and accurate to contact businesses and let them know they could be a hotspot for a fee. Absolutely genius as it’s perfect for cafes and restaurants!

Advertising: New Ideas For Different Physical Locations

So by capturing all this data, there’s no point sitting on this data goldmine right and not reaping the rewards? Exactly. Using this data, the creators know where their users hang out and can track their movements. Businesses can advertise in the areas that they know their target audience congregate in. THAT coffee shop which previously was always missed with leaflet drop campaigns is now a honeypot for the local bookstore to advertise their 25% off for students as they’ve discovered that the coffee shop has regular visits from groups of 16-20 year olds. Once they gain more customers, they can use the data further to see who they connect with – more students? Better chuck them an email offering a discount on course books if they recommend them to a friend. And the ball keeps on rolling.

Wrap This Data Up And Put A Ribbon On It

So what Nintendo has created is a giant, current, accurate database. Combined with the ability to cleanse, enrich and manage their data they have a huge asset on their hands.
Whether by chance or not, Nintendo has certainly shifted the gaming universe. Without doubt, plenty of other games which merge physical and digital worlds will be introduced, creating a new media category. This will of course create new revenue streams and opportunities.

So, suddenly there’s an increased spatial awareness that sweeping across the globe. Every Jigglypuff or Charmander, Pikachu or Bulbasaur poses a new opportunity for businesses. The value of a Single Customer View has certainly been unveiled with Pokémon Go and businesses need to use the data captured and optimise it to its full potential. The way location data is being used to create a Single Customer View has been revolutionised, and Pokémon Go is just the beginning.

Sources

Original article: https://blog.data-8.co.uk/2016/08/04/pokemon/#more-894

Comments

comments powered byDisqus
Data culture small

Read next:

Building A Culture Of Data

i