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Facebook's Move Into IoT

With Parse, Facebook have a way into the IoT developer market

1Apr

Facebook is looking to move away from it’s traditional role of social network and break through in additional industries. It is being done in much the same way that Google did after moving beyond being a search engine to the massive company we know today.

Their latest idea is to create a platform for IoT devices.

Having bought Parse in April 2013, the initial purchase was done in order to make the development of phone applications easier. The Parse platform took the difficult tasks like logging devices into a backend or sending scalable push notifications, meaning that it was ultimately much simpler to release an app for a phone.

This purchase has also had a secondary use, either by design or by luck.

As the Internet of Things has grown, the need for platforms to support apps associated with it have too. These platforms have regularly been created with one device in mind, so if you have a fridge that monitors your food levels, you will have an application that supports this. If you have an app that tells you the various ways to prepare meals, these two apps are unlikely to intersect, despite data from one being very useful for the other.

The Parse platform will give people the opportunity to incorporate data from multiple devices into one useful platform.

This will give people the opportunity to develop across multiple devices, so they will not be cornered into making one app for one device or one device with one app. It will essentially be at the core of what the IoT represents, the ability for elements to communicate amongst themselves.

It will allow for a 3D approach, going beyond simply turning on a switch when something happens.

Facebook are not the only company who are exploring this area, with Google, Apple and several startups already working on similar projects.

Will this be the launching pad for the IoT? 

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