Expert Interview: Valentino Tereshko, Big Data Lead, Office of CTO at Google Cloud

We spoke to Valentino Tereshko, Big Data Lead, Office of CTO at Google Cloud

24Jan

Ahead of his presentation at the Big Data Innovation Summit in San Francisco on April 12 & 13, we spoke to Valentino Tereshko, Big Data Lead, Office of CTO at Google Cloud.

Mr. Tereshko is the Big Data Lead for Office of the CTO at Google Cloud, focused on building a product and innovation bridge between Google’s top strategic customers and Google engineers. Prior, Tino was on the Google BigQuery engineering team. In earlier years he held various positions of leadership in several Silicon Valley startups, and could be found working as a quant developer on the floor of the Chicago Board of Equities at a boutique market making firm.

Tino holds a Bachelor`s degree in Applied Mathematics and Economics from University of California - Davis. When not at work, you can usually find him with his baby daughter, and occasionally playing beach volleyball, cycling, or paddle boarding.

How have you seen the data landscape change in the past 5 years?

I am enthralled by the slow and inevitable march up the data manageability stack. Folks are embracing higher level services, recognizing that they can get more for less, and freeing up to laser-focus on getting value out of data. Many of these newer services offer novel new architectural options, like separation of storage and compute, intrinsic security models, pay-per-use pricing, and seamless downtime-free maintenance.

Which developing data technology are you most excited about?

I am most excited about the advent of AI-assisted data technologies. Practices of database administration and data engineering are exercises in avoiding pitfalls and anti-patterns. While it's difficult to imagine databases without database administration and data without data engineering, AI can help folks get the most out of data technologies, especially within the context of security.

What are the biggest challenges that the data function currently faces?

I see organizations concerned with security, consolidating legacy with greenfield projects, and organizational transformation towards agility and innovation. often all three challenges go hand-in-hand, and, in my opinion, can be greatly aided by partnering with the right cloud provider.

How do you see data changing in the next 5 years?

The most sophisticated data organizations today think of data as a key resource to acquire, retain, and extract value from. They understand the importance of being scale-invariant and real-time. I believe that, as data services continue to improve, the barrier to being data-driven will continue to drop. In the next 5 years we will see more folks embrace this way of thinking. With that, I'm hopeful that the "data lake" term will be ubiquitously understood to be a 4 letter word.

What can the audience expect to take away from your presentation in San Francisco?

If there's one thing I want the audience to remember from my talk, it's that many of the problems they're facing today have been architected, developed, and implemented by their peers. One must not be so adventurous as to habitually live on the tip of the spear, but being a close follower has its benefits!

You can catch Valentino's presentation at the Big Data Innovation Summit in San Francisco on April 12 & 13

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